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Business financing: of course, there’s lots to think about

| Jan 9, 2018 | Business Formation & Planning |

If you are a Connecticut entrepreneur with a strong business vision, you’ve undoubtedly got a lot of things on your mind concerning start-up considerations.

A key threshold matter is of course formation. What entity will your enterprise assume? Will careful consideration result in a corporate form, partnership, limited liability company or some other type of business concern?

And what about your employees? Company principals must attend to a wide universe of worker-related matters at every stage of their business. Those range widely from carefully crafted policies and handbooks to strategies that protect against liability relevant to discrimination, pay issues and myriad other concerns.

And then there are government-linked compliance issues, insurance questions, tax considerations, protections for intellectual property and additional matters to reflect upon. The list of potentially important concerns right out of the starting block is long, with virtually every bullet point meriting strong and protective legal input.

An especially acute focus for most businesses — and at every stage of their development — is financing, specifically obtaining it on attractive terms and ensuring that solid fund-procuring options are always available.

A recent business article on business financing duly notes that successfully acquiring funding “takes a combination of perseverance, dedication and careful planning.”

A proven commercial law attorney well versed in working with diverse clientele can help business owners secure the financing they need to grow and sustain a company. Importantly, too, timely and well-considered legal input can help ensure an enterprise’s continued profitability through varied economic climates.

The above-cited article stresses that financing a business is “a major learning process.” The learning curve can be rendered less steep for company principals allied with a seasoned business law attorney.